gynocraticgrrl:

Lundy Bancroft on Domestic Violence in Popular Culture, Part 2.

Lundy has twenty years of experience specializing in interventions for abusive men and their families. He has also authored many other book chapters and scholarly articles. Lundy is a former Co-Director of Emerge, the nation’s first counseling program for men who batter. He has worked with over a thousand abusers directly as an intervention counselor, and has served as clinical supervisor on another thousand cases. He has also served extensively as a custody evaluator, child abuse investigator, and expert witness in domestic violence and child abuse cases. Lundy appears across the United States as a presenter for judges and other court personnel, child protective workers, therapists, law enforcement officials, and other audiences.

Lundy Bancroft is an author, workshop leader, and consultant on domestic abuse and child maltreatment. His work focuses on three areas: 1) Training professionals on best practices for intervening with male perpetrators of violence against women, toward the goal of promoting accountability and requiring change, 2) Training professionals on the dynamics of emotional injury and recovery in children who are exposed to a man who abuses their mother, to prepare participants to offer the most effective and safe assistance possible to children and their mothers, and 3) Supporting healing and empowerment for abused women, with an emphasis on advocating for the human rights of mothers and their children.

Lundy is the author of four books in the field, including

Lundy is available as a public speaker and trainer for professionals, and offers weekend retreats for women who have experienced abuse. - (x)

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via jaythenerdkid)

@4 weeks ago with 2186 notes

Thinking Juxtapositionally

hystericalblackness:

You stand in line for hours to have the chance to sit across from Marina Abramović (The Artist is Present) and you weep. You stand in line for hours  to see Kara Walker’s A Subtlety,  or the Marvelous Sugar Baby. You wait to enter the soon-to-be-demolished Domino Sugar Refinery and in this place that links you to sugar’s pleasures and histories and presents of slavery, coolie labor, colonialism, imperialism, death, and displacement and you cut up.

image

image

(via so-treu)

@4 weeks ago with 221 notes
crushcore:

mangoestho:

seasonalproduce:

immigrantgirls:

pushinghoopswithsticks:

thenewinquiry:

Quoted as wanting something that “feels black” for her new album, Miley Cyrus switches between embracing and distancing herself from the genre she seeks validation from. In a severe overestimation of her abilities, she said, “A lot of people wanted to try to make me the white Nicki Minaj. That’s not what I’m trying to do.” A month later: “Lil Kim is who I am on the inside.”
Like most dress-up games, racial drag is an exercise in fantasy, one that can exist only when femininity is constructed around whiteness, which in turn is constructed around purity. A desire to rebel against such a buttoned-up ethos leaves the white girl desperate for an identity through which to distinguish herself. To this end, white Americans have always been able to use black people.
Black women’s sexuality has been historically presented as deviant and exaggerated, somehow more “primitive.” The thrill of appropriation lies in accessing the perceived authenticity of black sexuality, the success of appropriation lies in abandoning its natural form. Transfer to a white body elevates the action. It’s no longer primitive because while nonwhite culture is assumed to be rooted in instinct, white culture is one of intent. Elaborate nail art, like the kind Miley wears now, appears stylish on a white girl but described as “ghetto” on a black girl because on the white girl, it’s an aesthetic choice whereas black girls just don’t know any better. White people clamoring to up their cred by appropriating nonwhite culture do so hoping to be rewarded for choices that are falsely seen as inherent in people of color. It’s this savvy that Miley wants us to be convinced of.
-“Can the White Girl Twerk?” by Ayesha A. Siddiqi

in case you missed it

IM GAGGIN BECAUSE A) THIS IS NON YA BUSINESS WHO ASKED U AND B)SHE HASNT EVEN BOTHERED TO SITE/MENTION ANY BLACK WOMEN WHO HAVE SAID THE EXACT SAME THING MY GOD THIS IS SO FLAGRANT

this is so gross tbh like non black women are so comfortable occupying black women’s spaces and speaking on phenomenon that specifically affect black women. like not only are you out of your lane but you KNOW non black women perpetuate antiblack misogyny too…like..this is not a poc struggle 

WHERE IS THIS BITCH WORK CITED PAGE!??!?!? WHERE IS THE FUCKING BIBLIOGRAPHY!?!?! WHO FUCKING SUMMONED THIS GIRL!?!?!? WHO! I WANT NAMES FAM!!!! PLEASE COLLECT THIS GIRL!!!!

OMG JUST NOAs a queer cis-identified Desi woman I am not into this bullshit from other Desis FUCKING IT UP with a kind of entitlement to speak on black woman’s issues, and black people’s lives / histories / cultures / realities as if we are coming from a similar positionally are you fucking kidding me how audacious and flagrant (FOR REAL) of you, I want to apologize on behalf of all Desis but we are not a monolith and it wouldn’t do much good anyway
I’m just so fucking tired of all these “radical Desis” taking up SO MUCH FUCKING SPACE SIT THE FUCK DOWN DO YOU NOT SEE WHAT YOU ARE DOING?! We have our own shit to sort out stop acting like you have the authority or enlightened perspective to address Black woman’s issues in such a public manner, then not even site the immense amount of work (intellectual / emotional / physical labor) already done by Black woman on these issues about their own lives and bodies, and on top of all that you are getting fucking paid by fucking New Inquiry! JUST NO. THIS SHIT IS GETTING TIRESOME.

crushcore:

mangoestho:

seasonalproduce:

immigrantgirls:

pushinghoopswithsticks:

thenewinquiry:

Quoted as wanting something that “feels black” for her new album, Miley Cyrus switches between embracing and distancing herself from the genre she seeks validation from. In a severe overestimation of her abilities, she said, “A lot of people wanted to try to make me the white Nicki Minaj. That’s not what I’m trying to do.” A month later: “Lil Kim is who I am on the inside.”

Like most dress-up games, racial drag is an exercise in fantasy, one that can exist only when femininity is constructed around whiteness, which in turn is constructed around purity. A desire to rebel against such a buttoned-up ethos leaves the white girl desperate for an identity through which to distinguish herself. To this end, white Americans have always been able to use black people.

Black women’s sexuality has been historically presented as deviant and exaggerated, somehow more “primitive.” The thrill of appropriation lies in accessing the perceived authenticity of black sexuality, the success of appropriation lies in abandoning its natural form. Transfer to a white body elevates the action. It’s no longer primitive because while nonwhite culture is assumed to be rooted in instinct, white culture is one of intent. Elaborate nail art, like the kind Miley wears now, appears stylish on a white girl but described as “ghetto” on a black girl because on the white girl, it’s an aesthetic choice whereas black girls just don’t know any better. White people clamoring to up their cred by appropriating nonwhite culture do so hoping to be rewarded for choices that are falsely seen as inherent in people of color. It’s this savvy that Miley wants us to be convinced of.

-“Can the White Girl Twerk?” by Ayesha A. Siddiqi

in case you missed it

IM GAGGIN BECAUSE A) THIS IS NON YA BUSINESS WHO ASKED U AND B)SHE HASNT EVEN BOTHERED TO SITE/MENTION ANY BLACK WOMEN WHO HAVE SAID THE EXACT SAME THING MY GOD THIS IS SO FLAGRANT

this is so gross tbh like non black women are so comfortable occupying black women’s spaces and speaking on phenomenon that specifically affect black women. like not only are you out of your lane but you KNOW non black women perpetuate antiblack misogyny too…like..this is not a poc struggle 

WHERE IS THIS BITCH WORK CITED PAGE!??!?!? WHERE IS THE FUCKING BIBLIOGRAPHY!?!?! WHO FUCKING SUMMONED THIS GIRL!?!?!? WHO! I WANT NAMES FAM!!!! PLEASE COLLECT THIS GIRL!!!!

OMG JUST NO

As a queer cis-identified Desi woman I am not into this bullshit from other Desis FUCKING IT UP with a kind of entitlement to speak on black woman’s issues, and black people’s lives / histories / cultures / realities as if we are coming from a similar positionally are you fucking kidding me how audacious and flagrant (FOR REAL) of you, I want to apologize on behalf of all Desis but we are not a monolith and it wouldn’t do much good anyway

I’m just so fucking tired of all these “radical Desis” taking up SO MUCH FUCKING SPACE SIT THE FUCK DOWN DO YOU NOT SEE WHAT YOU ARE DOING?! We have our own shit to sort out stop acting like you have the authority or enlightened perspective to address Black woman’s issues in such a public manner, then not even site the immense amount of work (intellectual / emotional / physical labor) already done by Black woman on these issues about their own lives and bodies, and on top of all that you are getting fucking paid by fucking New Inquiry! JUST NO. THIS SHIT IS GETTING TIRESOME.

(via brownroundboi)

@4 weeks ago with 491 notes

PSA: “Hey! Come lookit this racist/sexist/homophobic shit!” is not a game I wish to play.

navigatethestream:

eshusplayground:

So please, people, don’t go out of your way to link me to that shit. I do not need the reminder.

addendum to this memo: don’t send me messages asking me what are my thoughts/provide you with some deep insightful commentary

treating daily acts of oppression like its an intellectual circle jerk is a microaggression in and of itself

@1 month ago with 31 notes
@1 month ago with 168608 notes
@4 weeks ago with 7053 notes

"Racism doesn’t have to be about race. You can be a racist against people that eat little red apples. You can be a racist against people that have a drinking problem."

Toronto Councillor Doug Ford, brother of crackhead mayor Rob Ford, accusing their critics of being “racist” against them, and neatly summing up how fucked up and ahistorical white Canadians’ views on “anti-racism” can get. (via zuky)

(via chantulurie)

@4 weeks ago with 113 notes

thentheysaidburnher:

All men benefit from women’s reinforced fear of being hurt for saying no.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

@4 weeks ago with 9358 notes
occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops
Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.
What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.
This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food. 
Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.
Read More

occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops

Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.

What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.

This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food.

Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.

Read More

(via nezua)

@1 month ago with 9504 notes

sapphrikah:

sapphrikah:

art21:

"I don’t think that my work is actually effectively dealing with history. I think of my work as subsumed by history or consumed by history." —Kara Walker

New episode from Art21’s Exclusive series: An in-depth look at the creation of Kara Walker’s monumental public project for Creative Time, A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby (2014), at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, NY.

WATCH: Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

Whoa.

She is right.

I went to see this and wasn’t prepared for the amount of random inexplicable whiteness in the crowd. Here I am thinking only black folks concerned with this will be viewing this and it was a whooooooole lot of white folks. It only made me uncomfortable because I couldn’t figure out what would make them want to view it, what led them to it, and for that reason, I was positive the message would be but a whisper to them. Something they couldn’t understand at all.

Now I’m not sure what reaction she expected/wanted, but walking through the empty, haunting venue, I was annoyed that I couldn’t separate my viewing pleasure from the consuming white gaze. It was everywhere. I could barely take in the pieces of work because I was surrounded by jeering white people. Watching them consume these little black bodies and feel nothing like the sorrow that took me instantly. And then they were walking through the puddles of liquid sugar that was part of the art. Letting their children touch it. But in a way they became part of the artwork. It was like a presentation on the white gaze and their consumption of PoC.

Anywho, that shit was hard for me. I’m telling you old white couples stood by the grand ass of the mammy sphinx and smiles arm-in-arm for photos. SMILED. Hee-haw, a big ol’ butt y’all. Like the irony hurt. It hurt. Probably don’t even know what a mammy is. So yeah, the work isn’t critical of history is a sense that these oblivious people learn something. It’s kind of a product of history, or an example.

(via ethiopienne)

@1 month ago with 10737 notes